Category Archives : CREATIVE TIME – October 2012


CREATIVE TIME: Recap

On October 12, the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley and the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at the California College of the Arts partnered to host a live-streaming of the Creative Time Summit. This annual conference in New York brings together cultural producers–including artists, critics, writers, and curators–to discuss how their work engages pressing issues affecting our world. Summit themes this year included Inequities, Occupations, Making, and Tactics. Keynote speakers included Pablo Helguera, Martha Rosler, Tom Finkelpearl, and Slavoj Žižek.

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CREATIVE TIME: Amy Yoshitsu

Gutter punks act as both an ideal and a marginalized group within the consistently paradoxical subculture that is punk. They exemplify the values of punk by living as a physical marker of anti-authority and are considered part of the vagabond, vagrant, homeless population by the Main Street eye. “Vagabonds throughout history have been seen as ‘indeterminate’ in the sense that they do not exist in fixed social or spatial locations” but are constantly somewhere in the visual public regions of and between cities (Amster, pp. 3).

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CREATIVE TIME: Brian Barch

Humans have invented more things than we can count throughout our history, but none has had so much impact on life as one of our first inventions – the plan. Manifesting as business plans, battle tactics, essay outlines, and who knows what else, the concept of a plan has more or less defined the progression of human civilization since its invention, for better and worse. On one hand, plans have given us some of my favorite things in life: video games, science, space exploration, and more of the like.

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CREATIVE TIME: Heidi Rabben

What does the process of making mean for artists and other cultural producers today? Artist and activist Paul Chan offers one response to this question in an essay titled “What art is and where it belongs” where he discusses his expectations of himself as an artist and his experience making art in the following way:
“What art ends up expressing is the irreconcilable tension that results from making something, while intentionally allowing the materials and things that make up that something to change the making in mind. This dialectical process compels art to a greater and greater degree of specificity, until it becomes something radically singular, something neither wholly of the mind that made it, nor fully the matter from which it was made. It is here that art incompletes itself, and appears.”

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CREATIVE TIME: Regina Velasco

When thinking about the growing inequalities affecting our global society, my mind inevitably goes to cities. Cities have been the engines of development since industrialization; they have been a fertile ground for the “society of spectacle” and the world of commodities (Debord: 1967) and, most importantly, they represent the habitat and modus vivendi of more than half of the human population.

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CREATIVE TIME: Ashley Ferro-Murray

For me, tactics consist of making. Tactics take one thing and make it into something new. Tactics make things available in a different way. Michel De Certeau is interested in identifying tactics as the poetic “making” that works within systems of production such as “television, urban development, commerce, etc.” where consumers are otherwise left unable to “indicate what they make or do with the products in these systems”.*

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CREATIVE TIME: Simon Rhee

Asian-Americans are notorious for doing well academically. According to a report published by the Pew Research Center this past June, the rapid rise in Asian immigrants along with a high cultural value placed upon education and academic success, it is of no surprise that the growing influx of Asian-Americans into the high-skilled workforce is occurring (and arguably, has already occurred). Asians represent only five percent of the U.S. population, yet represent three to five times that in Ivy League universities.

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CREATIVE TIME: Dorothy Santos

Artists, writers, and technologists are expected to create with certain parameters before bending and breaking the rules. With new media art, programming, creative coding, and open source culture seem to be exploring new ways that are redefining contemporary art. The interactive and immersive works prevalent in new media works offer an entirely different experience of art. Yet, what happens when the body performs and serves as the catalyst for the production and creation of an artwork?

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CREATIVE TIME: Kyra Kennedy

On making objects. For me that begins sometimes with an impulse, sometimes with an idea. But usually the impulse turns into something because ideas are like dreams – they come and they go. And then, after a while that impulse turns into an established behavior. I think then, after a while, can one learn about what it is really about, the deepening process happens, the connection of dots. Sometimes I make ceramic things.

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